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Who Should Keep the Marital Home Post-Divorce?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a“right” answer to the question of who should keep the marital home upon divorce. In fact, depending on the details of the particular case, it may be more advantageous for neither spouse to retain the marital home, but to instead sell the home and split the proceeds. Below is a list of factors that each spouse should consider before a decision is made regarding whether the home should be retained by one spouse post-divorce, and if so, by whom.

Does either spouse want the marital home? If neither spouse wishes to retain the marital home post-divorce, the best options are likely to sell the marital home or to seek to rent the marital home to a third party if selling the home will not yield a profit. Alternatively, if both spouses want to retain the marital home after divorce, extensive negotiation may be necessary to determine which spouse should retain the marital home. In the event the parties are not able to resolve the issue of who will retain the spouse, it may necessary to proceed to trial in order for a judge to make this determination. Situations where only one spouse wants to keep the home are generally the least difficult. In such situations, it is generally only necessary for the parties to determine how the other marital assets will be apportioned in order offset the value received by the party retaining the home.

Can either spouse afford the mortgage payments post-divorce? In determining which spouse should retain the marital home post-divorce another issue that should be considered is which spouse will be able to afford mortgage payments post-divorce. If the spouse who seeks to keep the home will not be able to handle the home’s mortgage, other alternatives should be considered such as selling the home or awarding it to the other spouse.

Can the spouse who wishes to retain the home able to refinance the mortgage into their name solely? In addition to being able to afford the mortgage payment, the spouse who wishes to retain the marital home post-divorce must also have the ability to refinance the home mortgage into his or her name solely. Often couple’s obtain home mortgages jointly, meaning that both spouses are jointly liable for the mortgage. Divorce does not sever this joint liability, thus if the spouse who retains the home fails to make timely payments the other spouse’s credit may suffer if the mortgage is not refinanced.

Are there any second mortgages or HELOCs? If there are second mortgages or home equity lines of credit that have been taken out against the marital home, not only must it be determined who will retain the home itself, but it must also be determined how the debt against the home will be apportioned. Often, the spouse who gives up the marital home will resist accepting any liability for the debt associated with it. Thus, the spouse who wishes to retain the marital residence must also be prepared to potentially take on all liabilities associated with the home as well.

Is there agreement regarding the home’s value? This is often a sticking point between spouses who have otherwise reached a decision concerning the disposition of the marital home post-divorce. Even if the home is not going to be sold, the value attributed to the home is important because it directly impacts the analysis that must be conducted to ensure that the marital assets are divided equitably.

If the home is sold, how will the proceeds be divided? Will the home sale proceeds be divided equally or will one spouse receive a greater of the proceeds? If the parties agree to sell the home, not only must the division of home sale proceeds be determined, but the home sale price must be agreed upon and a determination regarding how the costs associated with the sale will be apportioned must be made as well.

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