Thanks for printing!  Don't forget to come back to Meriwether & Tharp, LLC for fresh articles!

Single Moms in Georgia

According to the Georgia Department of Public Health, between 1994 and 2011, the rate of births by single mothers in Georgia increased from 35.5 % to 45.1%. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report similar national statistics.  Over the past 20 years, the United States has seen the rate of single mothers more than double, rising from around 18% in 1980 to 40% in 2010. Although these statistics do not specifically account for the number of single mothers due to divorce, it is clear that over the past decades, Georgia and the Nation have seen an increase in the number of single mothers.  

Birth Rate of Single Mothers in Georgia – 1994 through 2011

Year

Total Births

Percent of Births to Single Mothers

1994

39,423

35.5%

1995

39,461

35.2%

1996

39,906

35.0%

1997

41,862  

35.4%

1998

44,248

36.2%

1999

46,267

36.6%

2000

48,943

37.0%

2001

49,806

37.3%

2002

50,385

37.8%

2003

51,804

38.2%

2004

54,276

39.2%

2005

57,295

40.7%

2006

62,887

42.4%

2007

65,068

43.8%

2008

66,177

45.3%

2009

63,759

45.2%

2010

60,810

45.6%

2011

59,613

45.1%

 

Researchers and those who compile the data reproduced above postulate that there are several circumstances that work together resulting in this occurrence. These circumstances include: divorce, death of a spouse, unplanned pregnancies, and several other socio-economic factors such as age, education, and income. Recently however it has been suggested that the increasing trend of single mothers in Georgia and nationally may be due to another factor: the decision of several young men and women to put off marriage until later on in life or to forego it completely. As discussed in more detail in our articled entitled: “Georgia Divorce Generally: The Decline of Marriage,” many Americans are choosing to get married later in life, or alternatively are choosing to forego marriage and opt for cohabitation with their significant other instead. Additionally, although many women desire to have children and experience the joy of motherhood, many do not desire to marry, have simply not found the man that they wish to share their life with, or fear entering into a marriage that may untimely result in divorce. In fact, according to an article published by Pew Research Social & Economic Trends, members of the millennial generation, or those currently aged 19 to 29, value parenthood far more than marriage. Regardless of the circumstances attendant with the increasing trend in single motherhood in Georgia, there are several tools and legal protections available to single mothers to aid with everything from co-parenting to child support recovery. For more information on these topics and more, see our other articles addressing child support, child custody, co-parenting, and paternity in Georgia.

 

// Retargeting Pixel